Home » Graduate Students
Jonas pic-32 Jonas Miller

Graduate Student
B.A. Psychology, University of Connecticut
Phone:(530)297-4443
Email: jgemiller@ucdavis.edu 

Sarah Pic Sarah Kahle

Graduate Student
B.A. Journalism and Politics, New York University, Ed.M Mind, Brain, and Education
Phone:(530)297-4443
Email: skahle@ucdavis.edu 

I’m interested in the relations between biology, socialization, personality, emotion and self-regulation and how these relations change over time. I’m especially interested in the role that physiology plays in emotion and self-regulation. My dog is interested in chasing rabbits.

 Georges 221 Georges Han

Graduate Student
B.A. Literature
Phone:530-297-4443
Email: hghan@ucdavis.edu 

Currently, I am a beginning graduate student working at the CMB. Prior to joining the HERD lab, I worked in the areas of psychiatric neuroimaging and stress neuroendocrinology, with a primary focus on affective disorders. Current research effort is focused on examining ways in which stress affects affective decision making and evaluating impulsivity as an endophenotype potentiating risks for substance abuse. Keywords: Emotion Regulation, Executive Function, Brain Connectivity, Psychoneuroendocrinology, Developmental Psychophysiology, Molecular Genetics, Systems Neuroscience.

 IMG_6976 (1) Natalie Troxel

Graduate Student
B.A. Psychology, Reed College; M.A. Psychology, University of California, Davis
Phone:530-297-4443
Email: ntroxel@ucdavis.edu 

My research program is primarily focused on understanding the developmental influences that lead to healthy and unhealthy adjustment across the lifespan, using multi-modal approaches to incorporate biological, social, cultural, and psychological measures. My ultimate goal is to work towards a better understanding of how we can best support healthy development by examining the precursors, potential developmental mechanisms, and resilience factors associated with emotional, behavioral, health, and peer problems. I am currently working on projects examining the social and emotional antecedents of early childhood psychopathology, and the cultural, social, and biological mechanisms by which poverty in adolescence may cause poorer health outcomes in adulthood.

dwpic David Weissman

Graduate Student
B.A. Neuroscience, University of Southern California
Phone:530-297-4443
Email: dgweissman@ucdavis.edu

I am interested in how contextual factors interact with adolescent neurobiological development to influence later outcomes. I am using neuroimaging, electrocardiography, and longitudinal surveys to explore the relations and interactions among socioeconomic, family, and neighborhood context, adolescent neurophysiological function, and outcomes including substance use, externalizing behaviors, and depression.

Luis-web-7a Luis Armando Parra

Graduate Student
B.A. Psychology, California State University, Northridge; M.S. Child Development, University of California, Davis
Phone:530-297-4443
Email: lparra@ucdavis.edu

I am a third-year Human Development graduate student in the Department of Human Ecology. My research focuses on the intersection of ethnic/racial and sexual minority identities. Specifically, I study the effects of compounded ethnic/racial and sexual minority prejudice (i.e., stress) on physiological self-regulatory mechanisms via hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and immune system functioning, and in turn, their effects on psychosocial adjustment (e.g., depression). I also seek to identify resilience factors such as parent and peer social support and coping strategies to help ameliorate the adverse effects of prejudice in sexual minority people of color.

Alice Wuermli

Graduate Student
Phone:
Email:

 

  Mercado_HDGG Evelyn Mercado

Graduate Student, Lab Affiliate
Phone:530-297-4443
Email: evemercado@ucdavis.edu

My research agenda is highly imformed by family systems theory and attachment theory, with an emphasis on implementing multiple levels of analysis (i.e., contextual, biological, psychological). I seek to study biological processes, including hormones and genetic risk markers, as factors that potentiate vulnerability to stressful relationship contexts. My research largely focuses on the impact of family stressors (e.g., marital conflict) on the quality of parenting and offspring development of social, emotional, and physiological self-regulation. Additionally, I am interested in examining the similarity in behavioral and physiological processes between family members (i.e., synchrony, physiological linkage, contagion). Ultimately I hope to continue to illuminate how family relationships get under the skin to influence physiological functioning, and help to uncover protective and/or risk factors.